“Miss Jacobson’s Journey” – Jewish Regency spy-romance-adventure

Miss Jacobson’s Journey by Carola Dunn is a lighthearted spy romance set during the Napoleonic wars and starring an Ashkenazi Jewish hero and heroine. I am so glad I found this book and read it on Shabbat. It was a quick read, the more tense/adventurous/suspenseful parts were exciting instead of stressful, and it was fun watching a hero and heroine combat adversity first and only deal with their feelings as a side dish. Reminds me of SFF shipper fandom, where, alongside the various pairings of Cap and his various hypothetical boyfriends and girlfriends, he’s still Captain America fighting aliens and supercriminals.

Miriam has been helping her uncle with his medical research, having adventures all across Europe and making friends with every Jewish family she meets. When he dies in the middle of the war, she needs to get home to England. In order to do so against… a blockade, I guess?… she gets embroiled in a plot to deliver gold to Wellington behind enemy lines. Accompanying her are her middle-aged lady’s maid/chaperone and two Englishmen. She and her maid are there to lend credibility to their “no, we’re totally not spies!” cover, and they’re there to give the two ladies safe passage–although Miriam winds up saving them a few times (surprising nobody who knows what kind of books I recommend.)

It’s not often I get to read swashbuckling adventure where people are regularly speaking Yiddish, or talking Jewish philosophy, or having to sidestep period-appropriate antisemitic microaggressions. But this book has value beyond “hey, they’re Jewish!” — between the plot and the romance I had a good romp. I especially enjoyed the running gag with French gentile policemen insisting Yiddish was a secret code.

Two things: if the blurb seems thoroughly obvious, don’t worry; the “twist” is revealed 27 pages in so they don’t have to spend the whole book talking around each other. Also, there’s a love triangle with a “hot” gentile who starts out fairly antisemitic but gradually learns his lesson through observing how we really are up close; don’t worry about him. He gets better and still doesn’t get the girl.

Content note that this is ‘sweet’ romance with no premarital sex, but I didn’t miss it. There’s some mention of how Jewish men are supposed to pleasure their wives on Shabbat, which is true! And TW for a lot of the gentile characters coming out with antisemitic remarks, but they’re all dealt with and contradicted in-text. (My opinion on the gentile character’s reason for resenting the hero’s father: if someone owes you money and resents you for the fact that they need to pay it back, that’s almost gaslighting.)

Kudos to the author for including Sephardim in the book as well, not just Ashkenazim, since part of the book took place in and near Spain.

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About Shira

Queer Jewish feminist author
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